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IR Film Review: GLASS [Universal]

The essence of the texture of something like “Glass” is taking something that can be so mythic and break it down to its most essential. For the most part of the film, writer/director M. Night Shyamalan captures much of what he found in “Unbreakable”. While not as revelatory as that film and on a significantly lower budget, “Glass” accomplishes much of what it sets out to do. Anchored by a brilliant James McAvoy who more than keeps balance with his older and more seasoned co-stars in Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson, the film paces itself well without losing the pathos of the characters. But what seems as a construct (or even more just as an exercise in narrative) can be more seen as a parable of hiding in plain sight of what the general populace can be allowed or trusted to understand.

“Glass” takes place in a much different time than “Unbreakable” but the characters, like many people, are the same. Elijah (aka Mr. Glass) is fascinated by superheroes but knows what role he plays. The Beast that lives within Kevin, McAvoy’s character, is there to protect him, no matter what the damage. And David Dunn is trying to protect the rest of all is us around him. Shyamalan’s direction is the best he has been in years simply because he knows exactly how to pitch these characters but also how to build that story at its bones. If one simply reflects back on the basis of his story which Shyamalan does here, he likely realizes that the simplest progression and thereby resolution can be the truth that sets the characters free. The McGuffin itself, in true Shyamalan fashion, which won’t be revealed here is a little flimsily constructed and needed a bit more exposition but its impact and Night’s ability to push it in this direction under a very restricted budget seems to have reignited what he is capable of (as “Split” obviously showed). Jason Blum, who also produced this film, needs to be given credit as well as he is known for low budget films but also known for making filmmakers think creatively by limiting them. Leigh Whammel said similar when he showed “Upgrade” at SxSW in 2018.

A greater feat was getting Disney to allow Shyamalan to use footage from “Unbreakable” which Night seems to have brokered himself in terms of reaching out. The importance of this undeniably works because there is congruence allowing motion of time and pertinence between 2000 (when “Unbreakable” was made) and 2019. It is no small deal and allows for a sense of connection and depth which might not otherwise be possible (especially since secondary characters from the other two films in the trilogy do play a part). All this said, while not an event film by any means, “Glass” is both forceful and confident without being too egotistical. Many film students can look at this transmutation of a filmmaker and see an interesting path and how inevitably it affects specific decisions both for the better but also at times, against expectation.

In an age of superheroes that, at worst, are simply CG enhanced constructs overarching with myth or, at the best, grand textures of the essence of humanity (yet costing hundreds of millions of dollars to make), it is interesting to see the sequel to a film that started the high concept notion of a superhero do so without the extensive or blown up budgets to accomplish the basic premise. Interesting enough before Night, to give him credit, the one constant is the one and only: Samuel L. Jackson who has found a way to exist in both these kinds worlds from the beginning chords to the present day. The accomplishment of “Glass” is knowing its own true identity which, if one sees the characters as they truly are, is all they could be and more, with an intended impact and meaning.

B+

By Tim Wassberg

IR Interview: Alfonso Cuaron For “Roma” [Netflix]

Fest Track On Sirk TV Film Review: IFFAM 2018 [Macao, China]

The texture of a film festival is based on the aspect of identity. The location and breathe of Macao, a former Portuguese colony off the coast of Hong Kong and literally right next to Mainland China gives it an undeniable influence but diversity of ideas which is refreshing. Add into play the aspect of religious history keyed into Catholicism on the roughly 30km territory as well as the Vegas sized (and at times slightly bigger) breath of the casino properties, it creates a unique dynamic. The programming at the International Film Festival & Awards Macao [IFFAM] reflects this sense of dynamic quality in some of the films experienced as well as a masterclass by the undeniable Nicolas Cage.

Masterclass – Nicolas Cage Cage was designated the talent ambassador for the IFFAM this year which makes undeniable sense since he is interestingly poised with a great dynamic lure creatively to this part of the world. While he has not made a full fledged descent into the Asian cinema market (China included), that would seem the most logical next step. He cites “Face Off” as one of his favorite movies to make since he is always seeing how to push the boundaries of naturalism in acting and, by essence, surrealism which he counts director Hong Kong director John Woo as a pinnacle of. It would be great to see Cage and Woo collaborate again. Cage gave many interesting perceptions in his discussion. He talked about advice Martin Sheen gave him when he used to hang out with Charlie Sheen at the Sheen household in Malibu when they were kids. This makes total sense since the elder Sheen made “Apocalypse Now” with Cage’s uncle Francis Ford Coppola. Cage also instills that his approach to naturalism was instilled in him by his aunt Talia Shire (known for her roles in “The Godfather” and “Rocky”). There is also the aspect that he shared regarding that Cher really wanted him for the “Moonstruck” role but he didn’t want to do it interestingly. This was very interesting in its candor. Cage said his agent Ed Limato convinced him that he could do “Vampire’s Kiss” if he did “Moonstruck” and he admits it worked out well. He cites “Vampire” as one of his other favorite movies he has made as well as “Bad Lieutenant – Port Of Call – New Orleans”.

In an unusual approach, Cage spoke about making “Wild At Heart” and that he had found that snakeskin jacket at a thrift store before they filmed. His spot on David Lynch impression saying “Nikky” (also Cher’s nickname for him) really gave ideal credence to the storytelling. Cage spoke about going to the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles as a kid to see James Dean movies (Tarantino now owns and operates the New Beverly). That is where he said he fell in love with movies since he grew up in LA and not San Francisco. He also spoke to his new embrace of VOD where people can see many of his movies now. He says that rather than turn away from it, he has leaned into it since the films that he initially made at the beginning of his career were small independent films and this is the arena you can make those types films now. The studio movies offered him a way to experiment with character structure and development on a grand scale. These new films from “Mandy” to “Mom & Dad” to the upcoming “Prince Of Ghostland” which he says by far will be the most “out there” film he has made yet (he has yet to film it) allows him to push the style of film performance in an age where it is harder to do so in a large film. He credits Jerry Bruckheimer for giving him the ability to experiment but, on those types of films starting with “The Rock, he explained that Bruckheimer told him he could play between the lines as long as it didn’t impact the story beats that needed to be hit. And that is how the Beatles and vinyl loving Stanley Feelgood in that movie came to be. Cage, a long time resident of Las Vegas, did his master class in the grand ballroom at the Wynn Macau which more than nicely gave an undeniable nod to his roots.

Loro This loose biopic of the recent Italian leader Silvio Berlusconi is lurid at times in its approach but distinctly and delightfully schizophrenic in its texture. This festival cut was initially a two part film, the first being from the perspective of a pimp/business operator trying to get to Silvio and then the second from the breakdown of the leader himself and how the two worlds collided. Director Paolo Sorrentino is sometimes known for his visual excess and the first half of the film is like the “Boogie Nights” of the political bribery world. The excess is meant to show the irony but sometimes passes over into self-satire especially with a doctor coming on camera to explain a drug fueled party involving MDNA. When the film switches over to the political leader’s machinations as he moves back to office, it becomes a different film entirely…not a bad one mind you…but different. But when it tries to engage across the board it is interesting yet clanky. Silvio always wins yet always loses. It is as if he is lost in the essence of what power means in comparison with the act governance though there is an aspect of ambition as well as the dream. Riccardo Scarmarcio plays Sergio the pimp. He brings both a humanity and a darkness that was also present in last summer’s “Euphoria” (which played Cannes) for director Valeria Golino. His journey and star power is undeniable so it will be interesting to see the progression of his ongoing career. Toni Servillo plays Berlusconi as a twirling vision of masks to the point that the performance is a perception of how far down the leader could bury himself from himself.

Jesus In a place like Macao, this kind of movie has particular resonance because of the Portuguese and Christianity influence. Made in Japan, the story here follows a boy who, after the death of his grandfather, comes with his parents to a small town outside Tokyo to take care of his grandmother. He is enrolled in a Christian school and begins his journey within this new space with no friends. The story of Yura is an existential one as he questions the essence of God and specifically what religion adheres in him. Out of the blue, a thumb sized Jesus (who doesn’t speak) appears out of nowhere and seemingly begins to grant wishes, although in abstract way. After Yura has finally makes a friend at school, the essence of tragedy strikes which gives him the perspective of what prayer might really mean. The movie is shot starkly and quietly in the 1:33 format (like the recent “Cold War”). Using reflexive nature and parallel scenes structure, director Hiroshi Okuyama creates a simple and clear but also eccentric portrait of a boy trying to come to terms both with life and death.

Happy New Year Colin Burnstead This dysfunctional family diatribe from BBC Films brings to mind such elements of drama and comedy as the film “Peter’s Friends”, a small piece Kenneth Branagh made as a director between projects like “Dead Again” and “Hamlet”. The main gist of the story here reflects in Colin, the supposed alpha male of a British family who picks up the pieces of his clan after his father has dropped the ball financially. Colin faces off against his would be deadbeat brother David who, in his mind, defiled everything of what it means to be “family”. David ran off on his wife and child and did not come back to see his family (blood or not) for 5 years. While this might sound sort of like a downer, like the ensemble volleys on screen before in this genre, there are enough sub stories with all the other characters to keep the pace moving. While not slapstick or laugh out loud in its texture, the slights and jokes continue to jab until they reach a pinnacle. As with most protagonists in these stories, no one is inherently bad or good per se but actions speaks louder than words especially when characters don’t listen to each other. The ultimate resolution works because like with all self confident movies, it knows not to spell out to the audience exactly what will happen after the credits close.

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