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Fest Track On Sirk TV Film Review: SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST 2020 [Remote]

The essence of SxSW this year was rattled of course in the texture of the coronavirus but films are films and their perspectives are their own. In selecting films in the same way as approaching for interviews albeit remotely, an interesting cross section comes forth.

Cargo The texture of life and science in an interesting progression. Using this predilection, “Cargo” uses a style of metaphorical perception to show the essence of its characters. In reference to a certain mythology, the movie takes place on a space station that is a weigh station for souls on their way to reincarnation. While it moves in a sort of dance with existentialism, the film also speaks to the rigors or freedoms one feels within identity. The lead character is characterized as a demon by sorts but not in the way the Western world believes it to be. He is just trying to make sure balance is maintained as the masses are transferred at their time. The reflection on Earth of what his superiors per se would like him to do is both focused but undone. When an assistant finally arrives, their interaction is both stilted and oddly kinetic simply because she might be taking his lifeforce. In an odd way, the subway stop of the people is an interesting transgression on life but also what constituted the essence of worries, regrets and needs. The eventual transcendence of the lead character is understood but (like “Moon” starring Sam Rockwell) most of the film takes place in two rooms creating a claustrophobia that works for the loneliness at times it tries to cultivate.

Scales The essence of mythology is always an interesting texture. Shooting on a peninsula in Oman in black and white is a distinctly interesting progression and adds a degree of perspective to the proceedings of this film. The story follow a girl who as a part of the ritual of her village on the sea is fated as a baby to be given to the ocean for sea maidens to reclaim. While this is a test on an old wives’ tale, its structure within a Middle East setting is both universal and timeless. The film works well because it is both modern in a way and traditional. While the dialogue is sparse, the actions of the actors speak volumes specifically between the girl, afflicted from her youth with “scales” on her feet and the captain she eventually works with to learn a fishing trade. She is both part of a community and ousted from it, especially in regards to her parents (most specifically her father). Yet she is the salvation in many ways. The stark landscape of the desert rocks against the water are undeniably beautiful and one wonders of their starkness in color. But the black and white, especially on many of the night shoots, adds a sense of both foreboding and mystery (without the need for extensive special effects). However when meaning is needed, their explanation speaks volumes.

Make Up The notion of identity filters through this story of a girl who is existing in a natural but basic relationship and, by extension, world. What the film does through its use of claustrophobia in her domain is create a sense of both want and abandonment. She wants to be something darker or outside herself possibly. There are imprints of those ideas which are bathed in fingernails, perhaps a kind of succubus ode that she only needs to give herself into. When she decodes her ideas into what they truly need to be then the film understands itself. The psychology is simply one basked in dark streets but red velvet lit warmth. The texture of the colors alone plays to the reality of what Molly, the lead character, is. She feels safe in the breathe of her co-worker while her boyfriend leaves her cold (seemingly on his end as well since he becomes less and less interested physically in her). The performance of the lead actress keys into that sense of isolation without resolving to say exactly what is happening with her. As a result it feels like a coming of age reflected in a certain Lynchian ode to womanhood.

Rare Beasts The texture of happiness or what makes someone happy with themselves is not a straight line to traverse. Within this comedy of sorts, Billie Piper, who gained notoriety as a companion on “Doctor Who” (and was honestly one of the most fun sidekicks that character had in recent years) brings in both a nuanced and yet vivacious performance without losing track of her voice. There is a similarity to an earlier more independent piece in “Wild Rose” (which played SxSW in 2020) about a young girl finding her voice. While that was an interesting film (and another redhead) this is a much more mature film that has its best moments when it lets the characters sit. One specific scene between David Thewlis and the actress that plays Billie’s mom is undeniably tragic but truthful and told by simply looks. Piper’s timing is uncanny. Her romantic male foil played in specificity because of his foibles earns stripes but Piper is the bright light. The ending tends to play more metaphorical but doesn’t bow down to expectations. Like Olivia Wilde to a lesser degree (“Booksmart” played SxSW last year as well), there is a dynamic ear for music and certain flourishes. That said, parts of the film also seem inherently TV visually based in terms of set up, not to its detriment but to the possibilities. Piper’s voice also is integral as she wrote the script so the musings, especially those when she is walking down the street, speak candidly to the hiccups of life, which this film is not afraid of showing.

Red Heaven This documentary follows a group of people who undergo an experiment to isolate themselves for a year in Mars-like conditions to study how the isolation and approach of an actual mission would affect them. This means no internet and the responses from ground control to move back and forth across space at intervals of 20 minutes as it would on the Red Planet. The quarters are tight, no alcohol and outside time is limited and attained as it would if they were on Mars with space type HAZ-MAT gear. It is an interesting psychological exercise as the participants were chosen with the same criteria as the astronauts would be. The aspect of certain psychological traits including aversion and closeness is an interesting structure but not together unexpected. It would have been interesting to hear a little more of the German scientist’s thoughts in her own language since that is something even in a confined space that could be kept private. It is introduced in the beginning but not completely implemented. Also the delayed impact of the information of the terror attack in Paris to a French citizen involved in the experiment also integrates to a sense of detachment. All of the footage was taken inside the dome by the people inside so it has the texture of being what it is but also a specific fly on the wall concept (since it used some rigged cameras but also the people doing the interviews). It is a structure of a petri dish but one that will open eyes and reflect long expected perspectives in others.

Sea Dexterity & Texture Tasting: The New Times Pairing 2013 – Feature

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The textures of South Florida bathe in the tropical heat with the dexterity of both sea and land. The key with any tasting as with the New Times Pairings is finding a balance of both heartiness, taste and presentation.

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A food truck/street food progression especially with the Mexican contingent always begins the proceedings well. El Jefe Luchador shows the angle with a lamb neck barbacoa soft taco with charred corn, salsa fresca and porland cream allowing for a spicy yet comfortable intention.

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BBQ has its place and within the essence of Smokey Bones, the pulled pork sliders offer sustenence with thick chunks of meat and a vicarious bread while Rebel House serves up its Cobia Crudo Vera Cruz mixing spicy tomato with lime, avocado and watermelon radish while the crunchy aftertaste of chicharrones gives a lurid and original afterthought.

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The Dubliner, as a new Irish Pub destination in Fort Lauderdale, moves towards the more baseline pleasures mixing a hefty mac and cheese with its incandescent shepherd’s piece while the Bimini Boatyard Grill, just around the corner near the 17th Street Bridge at Port Everglades, entices with a grilled pineapple shrimp flat bread which entices its connection with a vivacious bite.

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Using a cross-section of radishes and other herbs of sport, Green Spot Kitchen progresses the night with an interesting veggie ceviche piled high accompanied by an organically raised vision of bacon mac and cheese.while Sette Bello satisfies the stomach with a homemade tagliatelle with carmelized sausage and pesto for an excellent finish.

The New Times Pairings, held on the apex of Port Everglades at the Broward Convention Center, begins the tradition of what this famous South Florida has to offer.

Focused Progression & Independent Thinking: The 2013 Los Angeles Film Festival – Feature

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The Los Angeles Film Festival continues to be a focused progression of independent thinking though a good part of the structure contains already distributed product. “Europa Report” (wonderfully realized) had been previously picked up by Magnet and central gala “Fruitvale Station” (very much an independent) had been scooped up by The Weinstein Company from Sundance on a well-deserved pitch for an Oscar base.

The blend however between independent and mainstream sensibilities continue to percolate as filmmakers and their influences continue to shift.

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“I.D.” which takes place between the well-to-do section of Mumbai as well as its slums shows a young woman trying to unravel a mystery of a male painter who dropped dead in her kitchen. The use of extreme paradox works well here as it tries to shift the reasoning of poverty and the jarring progression of something as simple as an iPhone in a world different than ours. Ultimately the resolution is expected but the organic quality with which this reluctant woman makes her journey reflects well.

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“Drug War”, from international favorite Johnnie To, is a complicated mass of work but really gets into the mind of a cop vs. drug lord in terms of thinking and loyalty. It reflects very solidly with something like Michael Mann’s “Heat” because there is the necessity of becoming something you don’t want to be when coming to an end game. The specific idea of a captain having to do cocaine in order to convince other dealers of his possibilities and then having to utterly destroy his body with ice water in order to bring it back from the high is distinctly visceral. The tension builds up which explains how most of the movie is every bit as energetic as the final shootout which is one of the better gunfights in recent memory.

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Ain’t Them Bodies Saints”, even though picked up by IFC Films, definitely retains its independent flavor with a story of love separated, not unlike Terrence Malick’s “Badlands” in many respects. Casey Affleck takes on a more mature grizzled function than we have seen from him before while still resonating his stark turn in “The Assassination Of Jesse James”. Rooney Mara, best known as the title character in “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” gives an understated performance as a woman drawn into the violence of her husband’s world and who still pines for him when he goes off to prison. Rooney’s portrayal is interesting since it reflects her both as a person before her titular role but also shows the impact it had on her. Ben Foster plays a local policeman she once shot by accident and his relaxation into the role is unprecedented as he is much more known for jittery characters waiting to explode. The film is a study in stillness where life goes on despite tragedy inherent.

While the LAFF/Inside Reel interaction was brief this year with a couple other indies including “The House That Jack Built” and “Boxing Day” being reserved for TV interviews, the essence of the character base continues to shine on the streets of Downtown Los Angeles.

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