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IR TV Review: MARVEL’S AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D. – EPISODE 1 (“The New Deal”) [ABC-S7]

The progression in a Marvel world after the pinnacle is an interesting one because it becomes a perspective in how to perceive how events that came before differ without becoming an arduous paradox of unknown universes. The key with any process (especially with one rooted with this many backstories) is to keep it as simple as possible. With “Marvel’s Agents Of Shield”, the trick is knowing the ideals and how you balance them even in a new world. Episode 1 of Season 7 entitled “The New Deal” perceives the team in the past with an adversary that threatens to unravel what is to come. The plot points spell to the idea of not giving away too much, even within this review. The idea has very much certain tinges of “Doctor Who” with “Back To The Future” thrown in. The aspect of Coulson placed in a certain role is an interesting construct. The question becomes what allegiances the team and their adversaries have to time and which ones can unravel. There are a few key moments especially with Coulson that work especially in relation to Daisy (played by Chloe Bennett). The time period it comes to be set in is an interesting play but time will tell how much the thread should be pulled. All said, it is an interesting tease as to what the final mission of this show will lead to.

B+

By Tim Wassberg

IR TV Review: HOLEY MOLEY II – THE SEQUEL – EPISODE 1 (“Literally Jumping The Shark”) [ABC]

The aspect of competition shows has always been great but the comedy of errors within can be even more gratifying. But the question becomes what motivates people or even the reality of who they are versus (say) actors. That is the crux of “Holey Moley II: The Sequel” which makes mini-golf the stuff of buffoonery legends but with a “Titan Games” spin. While such shows like “Bonzai” out of Japan were great because it just shows the human barometer from a diffferent cultural standpoint, it is as much about willing stupidity but also willingness and unwillingness to do so. It can be a truly fun thing to watch. Here with Episode 1: “Literally Jumping The Shark”  Rob Riggle is a perfect fit for this though it would be great to see guest commentators like the “Whose Line Is It Anyway” people. However the shenanigans might be more controlled than we know. However different paths like Dragon’s Breathe placing people on fire is cool (though possibly a bit staged).

The first of the final holes that literally shocks people if they miss a shot is awesome but if the contestants signed a waiver, they are open game. The inclusion of Jon Lovitz is funny as a pirate who drives a golf ball blind or half blind is good (even if he goes a bit meta and says “Where did my career go?” Neither he nor Dana Carvey has gotten a little bit of that Sandler love for whatever reason. With Sandler’s Netflix deal it is surprising that hasn’t happened. But back to Holey Moley II, the progression of the different aspects of the holes especially people jumping onto a moving inflatable shark or trying not to get knocked in the water by rubber windmills or port-a-potties being opening, the list of course obstacles is pure entertainment. In a time when things don’t have to be serious, this kind of show is needed and understood. Riggle even goes meta and says in one instance “Where is the water?  I guess we ran out of money!” Only time will tell since 250K is set for the winner at the end of the rainbow wherever that may be.

B

By Tim Wassberg

IR TV Review: THE GENETIC DETECTIVE – EPISODE 1 (“The Case Of The Missing Lovebirds”) [ABC]

The aspect of genetic technology has found its way to the forefront of technology and continues to grow. Where these kind of investigative pieces are usually grounds within 20/20 or narrative fiction procedurals, “The Genetic Detective”, which was made in conjunction with ABC News, plays like a more reality based CSI but through the use of computers. The trick is to show the inherent path of DNA and make it accessible while not losing the process of the problem solving. What is great is that each episode speaks to the path of family and how it breaks down. Genetic Genealogist CeCe Moore, who once began as a model but returned to her love in genetics, was one of the first people to help move the structure of family trees to backtrack genetics before the advent of consumer DNA testing which only strengthened the texture of what she did and does. Adoptees started coming to her to find biological parents through this process. She was eventually brought in with a Washington based firm who helped her realize the bridge between privacy and investigation and how to work with law enforcement in this way. When she helped track the Golden State Killer, it opened the door t other possibilities on cold cases.

The aspect of cold cases now can take on a whole new meaning as long as the DNA of certain cases in kept The first one she investigates (seen in Episode 1: “The Case Of The Missing Lovebirds”) was in Snohomish County in Washington State in the case of a double murder that happened to a young couple where they were killed in separate places. The killer had covered up many aspects but not his DNA. Because the incident took place in the mid 90s, the technology was not quite in play yet. The explanation that Moore offers about how the certain genetic markers have to match up is fascinating. Without giving too much away, it shows how the DNA database that has grown in the United States really can aid with the process. CeCe Moore does a great job of representing the science while showing the path of data and analytics in this new investigative world. And it brings a different perspective to this kind of show which in many instances are done on smaller or more abstract cablers. With the texture and intricacy of ABC News and the ability to integrate graphics for maximum effect while still making it palpable, this investigative series shows the process without it seeming like school work. It also provides the inherent basis for inspiring a new generation of STEM students, especially women to pursue a path that fascinates them as it did with CeCe.

B+

By Tim Wassberg

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