Category Archives: Television Reviews

IR TV Review: “Light And Shadows” (STAR TREK: DISCOVERY) [CBS All Access – S2]

The essence of “Light And Shadows” reflects in the ideas of who we are and who we are to be perceived to be. In the most recent episode, Doug Jones’ Saru discovered that his instincts were really part of an awakening which allowed him to come to his unseen potential. The inference comes to a head as he is drawn back home to face demons, literally and metaphorically that have changed the idea of what it means to exist. This balances in Michael Burnham’s continuing search for Spock and the reasoning of this point. We finally see the first glimpses of Ethan Peck as Spock but what is really interesting is the diametric of the family as Michael herself returns home and like Saru must understand the difference between knowing her path and walking the path. The Red Angel continues to be a presiding influence but in true serialized storytelling structure it is starting to take on a different meaning in terms of its resonance. Connection is a big driving force but tolerance and understanding even more so despite differing socio, political, even world views. The ideal that ends the episodes again points to another piece in the puzzle which slowly but surely continues to unfold while telling very universal stories which “Star Trek” has always been known for.

By Tim Wassberg

IR TV Review: “The Sound Of Thunder” (STAR TREK: DISCOVERY) [CBS All Access – S2]

The essence of identity continues within the structure of “Star Trek: Discovery”. In ”The Sound Of Thunder”, the texture of the Red Angel is continued by a series of perceptions of changed definition. Saru is the focus and the return to his home planet after a transformation of sorts. While not as powerful as the previous episode simply because the stakes are different, this perspective shows, without giving anything away that rising awareness can affect change but also change the nature of who we are. This is true not just of Saru but of a recently returned crew mate. What is interesting in this continuing thread is what expectations create. Parallel structure definitely affects Michael Burnham in many ways and in certain perspectives, some of the canonized material seen sometimes can also run parallel to “The Next Generation”. As the narrative continues to unfold, the essence of the story is connected but while still making each episode, this one more than the last, able to have a essential life force of its own without sacrificing the serialized nature of the proceedings.

By Tim Wassberg

IR TV Review: “Saints Of Imperfection” (STAR TREK: DISCOVERY) [CBS All Access – S2]

The building of path interrelates to a spirit of trust. The series so far this season has been building on the basis of faith, or perhaps in a more esoteric way, trust. The mythic overtones whether in intimate relationships or in large scale pursuit paths define much of what is happening to the crew. The search for Spock is no uncertain terms is one of redemption for multiple characters, not just Michael Burnham. This episode interrelates a certain idea of the spore drive and its unintentional side effects. Tilly plays a big part in this and Mary Wiseman’s portrayal is starting to play a big deeper, which is of undeniable strength. Some characters intersect and go in and out of the story so perhaps there is too many working parts. But in league with some of the insights on faith and science that Sonequa spoke about in the character, the path becomes both more clear and more puzzling, especially when a certain type of radiation is detected towards the end of the episode. The key in this review is not to reveal any more of the plot points then needed. But ultimately the idea comes down to the path we choose. Now granted some of the dialogue can border on the melodramatic when it might need to be at times, more cutting. But in serving the story, especially with these amounts of special effects for a weekly show, the line needs to be walked. But in an unique way with the slow motion codas at the beginning and end, the tale of Discovery continues to be shaped in small bits.

By Tim Wassberg

%d bloggers like this: