Category Archives: Television Reviews

IR TV Review: STAR TREK – LOWER DECKS – EPISODE 10 (“No Small Parts”) [CBS All Access]

The trajectory of “Lower Decks” in terms of the first season has becomes more psychological as time goes on but the heart is what comes through. Mike McMahan totally understands this world. He may make fun of it but the lore he brings in is exceptionally deep. “No Small Parts” ends the season in an insane way but also structures the element of growing up within the ideal of what friends mean. The aspect at the beginning of the season which needed to grow was stakes and reasoning which only happens with the experiences of character. Boimler (as played by Jack Quaid) thinks he has an idea of what he wants but his life is only made better by Mariner (played by Tawny Newsome) through chance and a bit of strategy on her part.

Without giving too much away, the idea of the finale brings together all the disparate forms while engaging the high action Star Trek is known for. What is interesting again especially with the antagonist here is the aspect of Trek lore. Without even mentioning cameos or harks back (to say nothing about music cues), the animated perspective that comes to bear in the final moments can be as good as any of the live action. The only difference is that because of animation anything is possible. What McMahan has found at the end of the season (especially with this episode and the previous one: “Crisis Point”) is showing reflexivity within genre using different elements whether it is the holodeck, technology and mirror universes but to enhance character (which is when Star Trek is a its best). While the action here sometimes outpaces the story (especially in the opening minutes), it catches up to itself pretty quickly without losing a beat. This bodes well in the context of a second season, though things might change (always do).

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By Tim Wassberg

IR TV Review: MARVEL’S AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.LD. – SERIES FINALE (“The End Is At Hand/What We’re Fighting For”) [ABC-S7]

The two-part series finale of “Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.” does exactly what it needs to do in creating a legacy structure while also understanding the undercurrent of family. Sometimes that is lost, especially in the bigger movies, with the texture of stakes. But it comes back down to little moments. There is a couple here, primarily in the 2nd part of the finale, maybe not as powerful as they could have been but still heartfelt. One is between two sisters and the other between a sister and someone close to her. As the progression moves from the first to the 2nd of the two part finale: “The End Is At Hand” to “What We’re Fighting For”, there is still definitely something to be said of that story but who knows if it can come to fruition but it is a good set up. Of course the essence of this last thrust of the series is moving in the texture of who will win and the aspect of different timelines. The last two episodes pull out the stops with effects that s for sure. Most TV series don’t get this level of scope and in many ways, it gives it a good send off in that way. The “Groundog Day” type episode still takes the cake as the best episode of the season but in wrapping up the story it does key into the crucial character dynamics of the central team. The bad guys are a little more softly built, save for one, which is too bad because giving a measure of dimensionality which we did see with one character at the beginning of the season would have been interesting. After all, the context of Thanos in his quiet moments gave much more perspective to his nefarious intent but also a gravitas in his stakes. Giving away any more to the structure of what is happening will anchor and connect to the gist of how it affects the future phase since this was made with the next stories in mind. Textures of influence are seen but never directly correlated except once but the idea becomes how does the nature of the show differentiate and make that development better and richer. Ultimately “S.H.I.E.L.D.” creates a larger universe than when it came into it. This last season pushed both the boundaries of storytelling but also of the nature of motivation while still staying within certain tropes. And that kind of journey is always a good thing,

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By Tim Wassberg

IR TV Review: MUPPETS NOW – EPISODE 2 (“Fever Pitch”) [Disney+]

The continuing evolution of “Muppets Now” in its second episode “Fever Pitch” seems to a find a little more texture in its wackiness and starts to loosen up. It doesn’t lean so heavily on Kermit but for a brief bit which gives a lot more room for the smaller characters to shine. The aspect that is evolving here, unlike the movies, is that it is not a “nudge-nudge-wink-wink” approach. It is simply them going about their day and not breaking the 4th wall per se. From the first skit which is a game show, one of the smaller characters really takes the scene for a ride which is why it works and yet there is always heart. Two or three segments from the 1st episode are repeated but with much better results. But you need the right human talent, either to play off of or just bounce off of. Danny Trejo, who is promoting his taco restaurant without saying it, is the perfect foil for the Swedish Chef but still keeps it kosher. Some really funny bits revolve through this segment both because of the irony but also the visual. Muppet Labs also makes an appearance but again the strength comes out of heart, awkwardness and, in a way, heartbreak which always seems to see characters feeling different things. If “Muppets Now ” can find this balance, this show can really work. There will be misfires but as long as it can keep this off-kilter feeling and start bringing in those left field characters (like the Italian rat who riffs with Linda Cardellini and references a cat in his frame rummaging in the background) then this might be a Muppet foray that can actually survive beyond the season.

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By Tim Wassberg

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