Category Archives: Other Reviews

Sirk TV Graphic Novel Review: STUMPTOWN VOL. 1 [Oni]

The essence of a heroine is reflected in the ideal of her goals or pursuits. “Stumptown – Vol. 1” [Greg Rocha/Oni/156pgs] knows what it is and embraces it. Dex is the vision of anti-hero with a chip on her shoulder but a thirst for a good time. She needs money. She is down on her luck. She likes to drink. But she hits it with a sense of humor. ABC created the series adaptation that is premiering this fall. The pilot seen perfectly captures the feeling of the graphic novel and while the characters are reflective, liberties are taken in terms of moving the storylines. At least in the initial push the art captures a dingy feeling which is dictated to be Portland but could be Anytown USA. The major difference is in the music mix tape highlighted in the series which adds an undeniable tinge of the Greek chorus either underplaying the humor or overplaying the irony. While the investigations unit with Dex besets is already established, the texture of her relationship with Grey seems to be still developing.  The essence of violence seems to be a constant in Dex’s life though she seems to take it in stride but her world weariness is apparent. She wants to be loved but she doesn’t want to put too much work into it. The politics, which seem so apparent at times in the pilot in terms of the Indian Reservation law, are subdued here although the capture of the matriarch of the casino and her nonchalance is adequately relayed. “Stumptown” plays into that noir concept of a character that seems to be stuck in her life but accepts it as existences. Like the gumshoes of the 40s, the world and its intentions forever focus what the characters choices will be. Dex makes the most of it and the least of it in the same throw.

B

By Tim Wassberg

Sirk TV Graphic Novel Review: ZARATHUSTRA – BOOK ONE – THE LION THAT CARRIED THE FLAME [Europe]

The idea of mythology leading back before there was a nature of history (written that is) is an interesting conundrum. The balance of what society necessitates as the norm has shifted over the millennia depending on the structure of belief. “Zarathrustra Book One – The Lion That Carried The Flame” [Richard Marazano/Europe/60pgs] rests in an ideal of a matriarchal dominated society that fueled the idea of business and a monotheistic structure. The story takes place in the area that now occupies Iran. The texture of the gender perspective contained in the story is also a pertinent one. The beginning of this take of a monotheistic transformation speaks to a man looking to escape his past and living a balanced future. His past though follows him as a scourge led by a supposed manevolent God. When the army following this icon ransacks his desert town, it kills everyone. Our soldier saves only himself and the lead female ruler in the city that looks upon him as fodder. They escape into the desert. But the Army continues to search for one who has been marked. While there are textures of Aslan in the representation of the entities, the archetypes are true to form and the art reflects this without overindulging in its tendencies yet giving a sense of space and reflection. The story structure is told as a parable as the older soldier is now telling his story to his son. While this is only the first book, it’s point of view is sound but also resolute and focused giving the story a sense of will.

B

By Tim Wassberg

Sirk TV Comic Review: 9/25 Small Issues #1 [Marvel]

The essence of conflict and what constitutes the greater good is embodied in the ideals of what characters believe is right from their point of view. Whether it is Warlock seeking the balance his life or Norman Osborn trapped in the identity of someone he is not, perception is in the eyes of the reader and not the beholder in many of these cases.

The New Mutants: War Children #1 The ideal behind this new series is the aspect of paranoia within. While the texture of friendship looms heavily, the personage of Warlock is propelled to destroy his friends. It is an interesting progression in the character between logic and emotion with Doug, his main friend, finally bringing him back from the brink as a variation of a symbiote overtakes various members of the force. The visuals are motley and visceral though the specific art depicting Warlock and the accompanying lettering are the most telling specifically in the progression of emotions.

Fearless #3 This series continues to bring together the different women superheroes in the Marvel Universe. The first story has some of the women including Captain Marvel speaking at a girls’ camp when one of the kids comes up with an intergalactic beacon. Danvers, of course, plays it off but it is Invisible Woman who seems to understand the stakes. The 2nd story in the issue is more dynamic because it has a sense of consequence. It follows Hellcat as she tries to control her life without being pulled back in to her ex-husband and family’s expectation in hell. She however becomes a role model to a younger demon which is an interesting paradox. The final story with Jubilee and Wolverine is more of an afterthought but the color palette makes it stand out undeniably.

Spider-Man Velocity #2 This series and this issue specifically works more as a concept piece in terms of the notion of speed and perception. Spider and MJ can’t seem to understand the idea of this faster-than-the-eye superhero that always seems to evade Spidey. Once he recognizes what Velocity’s tell is it becomes a fairly basic storyline. The idea of a seance and the comedy that arises out of it feels more Bill & Ted than Spider-Man but the tone works overall even until the conclusion of the issue when the cat is seemingly out of the bag.

Black Panther #16 This issue continues an interesting parallel of the ideals of Wakanda Prime versus a new outpost on an inter-dimensional planet that has become completely juxtaposed by the mercenary dealing of the people in charge. That texture is never quite fully seen in this issue but the archetypal political structure it presents is undeniable and interesting to be sure which includes an older activist who seems to be goading people to revolution. This definitely has ramifications in science since it plays into the dividing perception of T’Challa as The Orphan King, In the end of the issue, the action tends to overtake the story which is too bad because the narrative dynamic is enough to sustain the progression without a large fight.

The Amazing Spider-Man: Absolute Carnage #30 This series issue really specifically moves in with the idea of identity and its perception in the world of symbiotes. While elements like Venom have their own way of balancing to a point inside its host, the story here with Carnage takes on a different personification with Norman Osborn believing he is the original host and losing all sense of self while he seemingly also rots inside his mind in a straight jacket. It is an interesting visual metaphor that is undeniable and keeps consistent to the very end of the issue which is commendable. some of the art which includes the almost ripping of s ymbiote from its host really plays into the concept of the ID as the character battle against their own specific demons.

By Tim Wassberg

%d bloggers like this: