Fest Track On Sirk TV Film Review: BLOODTHIRSTY [Fantastic Fest 2020 – Virtual]

The transformation of identity is an interesting construct depends on the character being played. The wants, needs, intentions and eventual goals of said characters can be changed by perceptions…and feeling of course. In “Bloodthirsty” (playing as part of Fantastic Fest 2020), director Amelia Moses reteams with her “Bleed With Me” lead Lauren Beatty for a different kind of film. The tone is different but the mood has certain similarities. In “Bleed With Me” it was how the relationship between two women evolved but kept motivations more quiet as well as their true nature. That film ended in a specific way while still maintaining it genre structure. With “Bloodthirsty” music enters into the mix in a specific way. In certain reasoning, it almost overtakes the story when some more specific underlying score structures especially between the two forces facing off might have been more mood structuring thereby allowing the songs themselves to have perhaps more power. That said, at one point, the music clicks when the title song is sang. It is bewitching and intoxicating but used almost as a set-up piece when its theme could be the entire motivation for the story. Moses makes certain choices and they are entirely natural to her storytelling. The relationship again (like in “Bleed With Me”) between the two women in the story is telling and yet the man who invites her up to this house to record music has textured motivations as well. In not giving anything away, the tension builds while not allowing the characters to go too wild except at certain moments. The music has a gothic Billie Elish tinge which is part of its allure. However, with the talent Moses has and the evolution of her muse in Beatty, it will be interesting to see how her visions evolve as her budgets grow. “Bloodthirsty” is a fun seductive parable which moves in beautiful directions yet does not quite reach the apogees it could have though some of its paths are undelible.

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By Tim Wassberg

Posted on October 3, 2020, in Film Festival Coverage, Film Reviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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