Sirk TV Graphic Novel Review: THE JEKYLL ISLAND CHRONICLES – BOOK 2 – A DEVIL’S REACH [Top Shelf/IDW]

The texture of almost steampunk ideology gets more of a real world perspective in “The Jekyll Island Chronicles Book 2 – A Devil’s Reach” [Steve Nedvidek & Ed Crawell/Top Shelf/168pgs]. The perspective is pushed by the idea of Nikola Tesla as a hypochondriac of sorts who is always trying to save the world against his own demons. This specific story involves him procuring the plans for a death ray which he thinks will prevent another world war. To give perspective, this story takes place in 1917 and Jekyll Island (which is a real place in Georgia) is the headquarters for a secret team under the auspice of the President. Their existence is to undergo secret missions with new technology, sort of like a precursor to the CIA but smaller. The different members have their different abilities. Karovik ha superhuman strength based on his bionic implants while Helen, like the female fire starter from “Hellboy”, has an essence of spontaneous combustion among other powers.  When The President tries to deport any terrorism suspects that are trying to target the United States, a responsive anarchy group: the Zeno are ready to take these dissidents into their fold by destroying an American warship. Post deportation, a bull on Wall Street comes alive with a sense of magic from beyond prompting the team into action. Like many stories there are wolves in the fold with spies inside the team. The essence of British intelligence as well as J. Edgar Hoover integrates into the story with their own special requests. These include optimizing their new technology for their respective countries. The team gets their own special high end hydrofoil but they race against time. The art in the graphic novel is effective but soft in certain perspectives with its simple hues but it is those same colors that places it in the respective period of the Rockefellers and Carnegies.

B-

By Tim Wassberg

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Posted on November 19, 2018, in Other Reviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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