IR Exclusive Print Interview: Peter Giraldi Of Blue Ribbon Content [WBTV Studio Day – TCA Winter Press Tour 2018]

The aspect of the diversifying element of digital and conventional is a continuing discussion that permeates both the marketing but also the creative and production ends of new material. Peter Giraldi, who serves as Executive VP, both of Blue Ribbon Content, Warner Brothers’ digital platform, as well as Alternative Programming at Warner Animation, has a unique perspective in both looking at the tastes of millennials and older but also to the new consumers presently consuming digital entertainment. Giraldi spoke with Inside Reel at the WBTV Studio Day at the Warner Brothers lot in Burbank, California about evolution, creative decision making and instinct.

We spoke before about animation and how animation feels. Can you talk about the different ideas and styles of how that fits into the bigger idea of what Blue Ribbon versus Warner Animation proper which has evolved from its shorts beginnings.

Peter Giraldi: That’s right. I split my time between Blue Ribbon and Warner Bros. animation, so a lot of what I do is still in the animated world, and I took that with me. Both Sam Register and I took that with us when we started Blue Ribbon. It is important. The thing is that animation is very expensive when it’s done well, and it’s all super long production time. So part of the thing that we’re doing is trying to figure out new methodologies, new partners to kind of condense that. Not the quality, but the — maybe it’s paperless animation, maybe it’s digital, maybe we’re doing more stuff in Harmony or a program like that, so we can condense that a little bit.

Does itcome down to the timeframe of it? Where you got 5 minutes first in terms of lenth, 10 minutes. You’ve got everything from Samurai Jack back to Teen Titans Go!.

PG: Yes, for sure. And I’m comfortable in the short form in between 7 and 11 minutes. I do a lot of stuff for Adult Swim, and those are quarter-hour formats. It’s more about, first of all, what the story is. Secondly, what that vision is, the art direction or the creative direction of whatever it is, and how you get that across, with the budget and the runtime. Is it very stylized, is there a lot of held frames, is there a lot of motion graphic trickery? Or is it full-on just drawing, drawing, drawing, drawing, drawing. There’s two different ways. We did a show called Ginger Snaps — it was on ABC digital– actually Ashley Simpson does the voice for that, but it’s a young writer named Sono Patel. And for that we used — we were very smart – we used an animation facility in New Zealand because it worked for us. We missed no turnaround time. Because by the time we got in in the morning, all the shots were ready for us to look at [from the day before], and that really condensed the budget for us. So, because of my experience in animation, I can look into it a little bit and understand the pre-pro and how to work it out for the budget.

How active are you guys in development? In going after, taking those meetings, finding those new voices…

PG: Very active. A lot of times, it’s like, how do we take what they’re doing and — maybe it doesn’t need anything from us. We just give them our support and let them keep doing what they’re doing. Sometimes, they want to learn more and elevate a little bit, so we bring some more “traditional” talent into the party. Or sometimes they actually say, “You know what, I’m done. Can I mess around with the Hair Bears or Snagglepuss?” Sometimes what helps attract talent as well, isnot us pushing…it’s people coming to us and saying, “I’ve been a Huckleberry Hound fan my whole life.” It’s like, “Well, come on over.” And to be open to able to try new things with it…within reason.

I was able to see Killing Joke finally, but I saw it Joke on my tablet. Nothing else beyond that. Can you talk about that, and talk about people consuming that way, especially animation, not just live action.

PG: I think, for animation specifically, it’s fantastic because it’s backlit — and I’m talking pure technical now — it’s a backlit medium. [So the tablet is] fantastic for animation. It’s perfect. That’s the way we create it, half the time, either on a lightbox, or a [Cintiq or something like that. It’s great, the range of color, the range of effects, the range of — and even in the pre-production of how it’s actually created — it’s great. Digital has done great things for animation. What has not done great is people thinking they don’t have to draw anymore. There’s no getting away from drawing. It takes a lot of drawings to make a lot of good animations.

We don’t want 2D to go away.

PG: That’s not where my tastes lie in CG. I’m a 2D guy. In a 3D world.

By Tim Wassberg

Advertisements

Posted on January 15, 2018, in Entertainment Industry Coverage and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: